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Weekly Blog on creativity and what it takes to be an artist by David Limrite (artist, teacher, mentor & coach)

PRETEND LIKE YOU KNOW

I am continuing to work on these small 10"x 8” pieces until I feel like I have worked some things out, and feel more comfortable taking on some larger work. © 2017 David Limrite


“To sustain the same attitude long enough - to pull off a piece that takes months and months to do, gets tiresome, which means that I can’t worry about how I feel when I paint. I have to go into the studio and paint whether I feel like it or not.”
Chuck Close, Artist


Pretend Like You Know

If I am pushing myself and taking risks with my art, I often begin a painting unsure about what will happen. Sometimes I am even fearful, or timid, or filled with doubt about my ability to create what I want to create.

I do not like beginning a painting feeling this way, and the painting usually ends in disaster.

My best work happens when I am feeling confident, or I just want to have fun painting, or I want to explore process and I just don’t care what the result looks like.

So, when I find myself fearful or timid at the beginning of a painting, I try and pretend like I know exactly what I am doing. This allows me to feel brave and filled with intention. And more importantly, pretending like I know what I am doing, allows me to take more risks and paint more confidently.

This concept may sound crazy, but I am telling you, pretending like you know what you are doing at the start of a painting will help you dive right in and begin painting, while eliminating fear. And you will create much better work in the process.

Best,

David

P.S. Check out this video where I give a quick explanation on the difference between vine charcoal, compressed charcoal and nupastel.


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Creating your work is different than stepping back and assessing your work. Learn how to apply a discerning eye to your own work once you've put the brushes down.

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